Curriculum

The Teaching of Reading

At St.Cedd’s it is through reading that much of our learning takes place. Competence in reading provides the key to independent learning and has a direct effect upon progress in most areas. Reading is crucial in developing children’s self-confidence and motivation, therefore the teaching of reading is given high priority within the curriculum at St. Cedd’s.

Children begin learning to read at the start of the Reception year with the teaching of Fast Track Phonics. This is a systematic phonics programme that builds children’s skills in letter-sound correspondence and word level blending and segmenting.

The aim of Fast Track Phonics is to ensure that children master the following skill areas:

  • Auditory Blending and Segmenting
  • Letter-Sound Correspondence
  • Word-Level Blending
  • Sound Spelling

Auditory Blending and Segmenting

Children are taught that all words are made up of separate units of speech (phonemes). This skill facilitates reading and spelling. They begin to understand that when sounds are quickly blended together, they sound like one unit of speech. When children learn that there are, for example, three sounds in a word (c,a,t), it logically follows that there are three graphemes needed to represent the sounds. Understanding the concept of the separability of sounds in words gives children the building blocks for understanding how the alphabet works to represent speech. Children rely less on memorising to read words, and more on applying their blending and segmenting skills to analyse, read and write words.

Letter-Sound Correspondence

To develop fluency in reading, children need to establish an automatic connection between letters and their sounds. They begin to use their letter-sound correspondence to sound out and read words. As their knowledge of letter sounds develops, the easier it is for them blend the sounds into words for reading. Children are learnt to hear a sound, then read and write the letter that represents that sound.

Word-Level Blending

Word-level blending is the ability to look at a word, recognise the graphemes, make the sound for each grapheme, then put the sounds together to say the word. The understanding of letter-sound correspondence alongside auditory blending and segmenting aid the performance of this more complex task.

Sound Spelling

Sound spelling is the ability to successfully sound out a word and transcribe the sounds into letters.

The teaching of Fast Track Phonics continues throughout Year One and Two, and is used as an intervention tool within Key Stage Two.

As well as the teaching of phonics, there are three structured ways in which children are taught and helped to develop their reading skills:

Shared Reading

This takes place during the English lesson. The teacher and children work together to explore a variety of text including fiction, non-fiction and poetry. The teacher models reading during this time with each lesson having a specific focus, for example, comprehension, word-building, spelling patterns and punctuation. Shared reading provides a context for applying and teaching specific skills and enables children to access reading material that they may not otherwise be able to read.

Guided Reading

Guided Reading is used to develop fluency in reading and comprehension skills. Children are exposed to a variety of text types. They read short extracts whilst answering questions to help them comprehend the text, through; previewing, self-questioning, making connections, visualising, knowing how words work, monitoring, summarising and evaluating.

Guided Reading is taught as a lesson each day, with the children practising skills taught through focused activities.

Individual Reading

Books used for individual reading are matched to the child’s reading ability level. Reading is assessed at least once a term which helps to determine which colour band the child should be reading. Assessment of reading involves checking for fluency in reading alongside comprehension of the text. When a child is secure in both elements they will be moved to the next colour band. Children will read a variety of books within each colour band including fiction, non-fiction and poetry from a range of reading schemes, including Collins, New Reading 360, Oxford Reading Tree and Nelson. This helps to develop an understanding of a variety of text. Once the children are confident readers they will choose what to bring home from a wide range of titles. Children are given the opportunity to read with a teacher or learning support assistant each week. Books can be changed up to five times per week.

Please take the time to listen to your child read and to discuss the book with them, asking questions, explaining the meaning of words and asking for their ideas and opinions about what they have read. Please make a comment in their reading diary indicating that you have listened to them read. All children who have read at least three times across the week shown through parent comment in the diary, will be entered into a reading prize draw.

Assessment

Learning Ladders are used as a form of formative assessment. Key performance indicators, that stem from the national curriculum, are printed in the front of children’s books and dated when an objective has been achieved. NFER termly tests are used as a summative reading assessment, alongside previous SATs papers for Year 2 and 6.

Library Books

Children have weekly opportunities to choose a library book to take home. The main purpose of library books is that they are fun and help children to develop a love of books. Children are able to choose any book, regardless of reading ability, which we hope that you will enjoy sharing and reading together.

How Parents Can Help:

There are many ways that you can help to promote the enjoyment of reading at home. Here are some ideas:

  • Visit the local library and borrow books that you can enjoy together
  • Model reading; expressing a personal interest in reading will encourage your child to enjoy reading too
  • Whilst out and about encourage your child to read road signs, shop names, product names, logos, notices etc
  • Play games such as ‘I Spy’ to encourage initial sound recognition
  • Whilst cooking encourage your child to read the recipe/ instructions to you
  • Audio and e. books are really useful for modelling how reading sounds

Encourage your child to experience a range of reading materials such as picture books, hard backs, comics, magazines and information books.

Have fun with reading!

Useful Websites

The Teaching of Writing

At St. Cedd’s we believe that writing is an essential skill not only for further learning but in later life. We aim to ensure all children reach their full potential in writing, enabling them to become confident, fluent and imaginative writers.

EYFS

Children begin learning to write at the start of the Reception year through the teaching of Fast Track Phonics. This is a systematic phonics programme that builds children’s skills in letter-sound correspondence and world level blending and segmenting (see ‘The Teaching of Reading’ for more information).

The development of fine and gross motor skills is critical for the act of writing and during the Reception year there are many opportunities for physical development to support the development of writing, influencing core strength, dexterity, and eye-to-hand coordination. We also understand that communication and language sit at the heart of writing so we work on building language and supporting communication which feeds into the children’s writing, beginning at the very earliest stages of mark-making. Within our curriculum, there are many opportunities for children to play around with language, using alliteration, nursery rhymes, and listening activities to build the phonological awareness that is so vital as a basis for learning phonics. The more vocabulary the children have, the better placed they will be to become fluent writers.

Staff model writing through shared writing as well as engaging with the children’s play, e.g. writing shopping lists in the role-play area, chalking hopscotch in the outdoor area or making signs for the art area. Activities are planned based on the children’s interests, engaging them in particular themes or topics, providing an environment rich in opportunities for mark-making/ writing, providing them with the foundations needed to be ready for Year 1.

In KS1 and KS2, this early learning is extended, with children taught transcription (spelling and handwriting) and composition (articulating ideas and structuring them in speech and writing) as well as how to plan, revise and evaluate their writing. These skills are taught during daily writing lessons and are rehearsed when writing in all areas of the curriculum.

Writing is taught in units, where children explore different genres of writing such as narrative, non-fiction and poetry. Each genre is taught over a period of 2-3 weeks, enabling children to fully immerse themselves in the techniques needed for each type of writing.

Visits from touring theatre companies such as the English Shakespeare Company and visiting authors, poets and storytellers are also used to inspire the children’s writing, alongside planning for cross-curricula links.

Assessment

Learning Ladders are used as a form of formative assessment. Key performance indicators, that stem from the national curriculum, are printed in the front of children’s books and dated when an objective has been achieved.

Pen Licence

As a school, we have high expectations of pupils handwriting and presentation. All children begin writing in pencil and are awarded a Pen Licence when showing consistently good levels of handwriting and presentation across subjects.

How Parents Can Help:

There are many ways that you can help the development of writing at home. Here are some ideas:

  • Involve your child in shopping visits by encouraging them to write shopping lists
  • Allow them to write greetings cards and messages
  • Write a diary of events outside of school
  • Create treasure maps or clues for games
  • Write about their favourite stories or create stories of their own
  • Write instructions teaching someone how to do something, e.g. baking a cake, building a lego model, growing a flower
  • Writing letters to family or friends

Writing on a Page

Phonics and Spelling on a Page

The Teaching of Mathematics

Mathematics is a high priority for our children at St Cedd’s Church of England Primary school. We recognise the importance of fluency of mathematical concepts, as well as the ability and opportunities for children to apply their knowledge to reasoning and problem solving regularly. We want our children to be confident mathematicians and problem-solvers who can use their understanding throughout their daily lives.

EYFS

During Reception, teachers use the EYFS 2021 statutory guidance to inform and support planning for Mathematics alongside White Rose Maths and the KinderCorner curriculum. Mathematics is specific area of learning in EYFS and children are supported to attain the Early Learning Goals (ELGs) in Number and Numerical patterns. Mathematics is taught daily using White Rose Maths and skills are reinforced through an additional 15 minutes maths session.

White Rose Maths

Since September 2020, we have adopted the scheme, ‘White Rose Maths’ for all year groups. We currently follow White Rose Maths’ mixed age year group progression documents except in the Reception year. This was adopted as it focuses on fluency, reasoning and problem solving of all areas of the national curriculum for maths. Other resources are used to support and extend children’s understanding. To support this, teachers and support staff have completed CPD training to secure their understanding of ‘bar modelling’, which is a visual method that children can use to support problem solving in the majority of areas of maths.

KS1 and KS2

Due to its high importance, Mathematics is not only taught for an hour daily, but is fed through early morning work, Fluent in Five practice and throughout other areas of the curriculum.

Fluent in Five

Our children take part in regular arithmetic practice: each day, the children are given five minutes to answer a series of age-appropriate arithmetic questions focused on quick-recall. The impact of this can be seen in children’s confidence of recall skills, and gives them the opportunity to repeat areas of maths that they have already covered, ensuring it is committed to long-term memory.

Assessment

Learning Ladders are used as a form of formative assessment. Key performance indicators, that stem from the national curriculum, are printed in the front of children’s books and dated when an objective has been achieved. NFER termly tests are used as a summative assessment, alongside previous SATs papers for Year 2 and 6.

Across the school, children complete end-of-unit assessment papers from White Rose Maths which demonstrate whether children have a secure understanding of the area of mathematics.

Homework:

TTRockstars

Times tables are essential for all areas of maths learning. Those with a solid understanding of their multiplication facts will find it easier to answer mental arithmetic questions. This, in turn, means that children will gradually be able to use this knowledge to quickly solve maths problems. In year 4, children are expected to complete a national online multiplication tables assessment.

All children have a username and password for Times Tables Rockstars (TTRockstars). Children are expected to practise their times-tables at least three times per week – this can be in the form of TTRockstars (online) or offline. This should be recorded in their reading records. All children who have practised at least three times across the week, will be entered into a maths prize draw.

Maths Skills

Previously, the children would complete weekly maths skills as part of their Friday lesson. From September 2021, weekly maths skills will be given as a weekly homework. Children are expected to hand in their maths skills by Thursday each week, ready to mark as a class on Friday.

How Parents Can Help:

Maths is an essential part of everyday life; often, we don’t even realise that we’re using it! There are many ways that you can help to promote the enjoyment of maths at home aside from supporting your children with their maths skills and times tables. Here are some ideas:

  • Bake something together.
    If you’re children are older, you could ask your children to halve/ quarter/ find a fraction the recipe.
  • Count together!
    You could even use a stopwatch and challenge yourselves e.g. How many jumping jacks can you do in a minute? How many times can you jump rope or bounce a ball without missing? Count and see.
  • Measure together.
    Measure the distance of something using rulers, meter sticks, measuring tape or even a trundle wheel! E.g. Take a guess, then throw the ball as far as you can and measure the distance.
  • Build something together!

There are so many maths skills that can be incorporated into building something!

  • Plan a dinner or a party!
    Having your children think about ingredients and budgets are very useful life skills.
  • Shop using a set budget.

Give your child a list and a budget for your weekly food shopping! This can help them with money and decimals.

  • Set a personal best

If your child enjoys sports and competition, challenge them to set a personal best to support them with counting and time.

  • Read stories that include maths.
    There are so many books that include maths – see our reading list below!

If you have any other fantastic ideas, please let us know so we can add to the list!

Useful Websites

  • BBC Bitesize – KS2 Maths

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/z6vg9j6

If you have any other fantastic ideas, please let us know so we can add to the list!

Useful books

EYFS & KS1

  • How Many Jelly Beans? Andrea Menotti & Yancey Labat
  • 365 Penguins Jean-Luc Fromental & Joëlle Jolivet
  • One is a snail, ten is a crab: a counting by feet book April Pulley Sayre, Jeff Sayre & Randy Cecil
  • How many legs? Kes Gray & Jim Field
  • Shape Trilogy (Triangle, Square & Circle) Mac Barnett & Jon Klassen
  • Centipede’s 100 Shoes Tony Ross
  • Fruits: A Caribbean Counting Poem Valerie Bloom & David Axtell
  • Just A Second Steve Jenkins
  • How Much Does a Ladybird Weigh? Alison Limentani
  • How Big is a Million? Anna Milbourne & Serena Riglietti
  • Actual Size Steve Jenkins
  • Shaping Up Summer Lizann Flatt & Ashley Barron
  • Have You Seen My Dragon? Steve Light
  • A Place for Zero: A Math Adventure Angeline Sparagna LoPresti

KS2

  • Maths Adventures by Rayanne Vieira
  • What’s the Point of Maths? DK
  • A Computer Called Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon Suzanne Slade
  • Hidden Figures Paperback Margot Lee Shetterly
  • The Boy Who Loved Math: The Improbable Life of Paul Erdos Debborah Heiligman
  • Fractions in Disguise: A Math Adventure (Charlesbridge Math Adventures) Edward Einhorn

If you have any other fantastic ideas, please let us know so we can add to the list!

At St. Cedd’s, we teach Science through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be a Scientist. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• The ability to think independently and raise questions about working scientifically and the knowledge and skills that it brings.

• Confidence and competence in the full range of practical skills, taking the initiative in, for example, planning and carrying out scientific investigations.

• Excellent scientific knowledge and understanding which is demonstrated in written and verbal explanations, solving challenging problems and reporting scientific findings.

• High levels of originality, imagination or innovation in the application of skills.

• The ability to undertake practical work in a variety of contexts, including fieldwork.

• A passion for science and its application in past, present and future technologies.

To enhance our Science Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities such as visits out of school and visitors in school who demonstrate scientific concepts through motivating activities as well as through after school/ lunchtime clubs.

Science on a Page

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

St. Cedd’s Church of England Primary School places religious education and the development of Christian character at the very heart of its work. The school is participating in the Understanding Christianity project, which offers a coherent approach to teaching and learning about Christianity, in the wider RE curriculum with the aim of supporting pupils in developing their own thinking and their understanding of Christianity, as a contribution to their understanding of the world and their own experience within it.

We aim to see our pupils from their earliest days at school and throughout their time at our school begin to develop a coherent understanding of Christian belief and practice (including, but not limited to, Anglican Christianity), exploring the significant theological concepts within Christianity as part of developing their wider religious, theological and cultural literacy. Alongside this, the school has a commitment to supporting teachers in developing their own knowledge and understanding of Christianity theology to be able to teach with confidence.

Understanding Christianity identifies eight core concepts at the heart of mainstream Christian belief.  It sets out some knowledge ‘building blocks’, to clarify what pupils should know and understand about these concepts at each school phase. It provides a teaching and learning approach to unpack these concepts and their impact in the lives of Christians in the UK and the world today, making connections with the world of the pupils and their wider understanding.

This approach to teaching about Christianity builds up pupils’ encounters with the core concepts through biblical texts, placing the texts and concepts within the wider Bible story. Each unit addresses a concept, through some key questions, exploring core Bible texts, their impact for Christians, and possible implications for pupils. Each unit incorporates the three elements below:

  • Making sense of the text: developing pupils’ skills of reading and interpretation; understanding how Christians interpret, handle and use biblical texts; making sense of the meanings of texts for Christians.
  • Understanding the impact: examining ways in which Christians respond to biblical texts and teachings, and how they put their beliefs into action in diverse ways within the Christian community and in the world.
  • Making connections: evaluating, reflecting on and connecting the texts and concepts studied, and discerning possible connections between these and pupils’ own lives and ways of understanding the world.

Pupils’ achievement is assessed against the knowledge building blocks and against end-of-phase outcomes related to the elements above.

This approach offers coherence and progression in terms of pupils’ knowledge, skills and understanding. It supports pupils’ abilities to handle texts, as well as understanding how and why Christians interpret biblical texts differently.  It also places emphasis on the role of the pupil as reader, bringing their own world to the text whilst giving them the opportunity to allow the text to enlarge their understanding of the world.

Alongside this, the school also prepares pupils to be global citizens, developing and understanding of and respect for the range of faiths and beliefs of others. We do this through RE lessons, following the Essex Agreed Syllabus for RE other faiths materials and engaging in the work of the British Council to develop links with schools in other countries.

RE on a Page

RE Statement of Entitlement

Collective Worship Schedule

At St. Cedd’s, we teach Art and Design through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be a Artist. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• The ability to use visual language skillfully and convincingly (for example, line, shape, pattern, colour, texture, form) to express emotions, interpret observations, convey insights and accentuate their individuality.

• The ability to communicate fluently in visual and tactile form.

• The ability to draw confidently and adventurously from observation, memory and imagination.

• The ability to explore and invent marks, develop and deconstruct ideas and communicate perceptively and powerfully through purposeful drawing in 2D, 3D or digital media.

• An impressive knowledge and understanding of other artists, craft makers and designers.

• The ability to think and act like creative practitioners by using their knowledge and understanding to inform, inspire and interpret ideas, observations and feelings.

• Independence, initiative and originality which they can use to develop their creativity.

• The ability to select and use materials, processes and techniques skillfully and inventively to realise intentions and capitalise on the unexpected.

• The ability to reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others.

• A passion for and a commitment to the subject.

To enhance our Art and Design Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities such as visits out of school and visitors in school who demonstrate artistic concepts through motivating activities as well as through after school/ lunchtime clubs.

Art and Design on a Page

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

At St. Cedd’s, we teach Computing through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be Computer Savvy. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• Competence in coding for a variety of practical and inventive purposes, including the application of ideas within other subjects.

• The ability to connect with others safely and respectfully, understanding the need to act within the law and with moral and ethical integrity.

• An understanding of the connected nature of devices.

• The ability to communicate ideas well by using applications and devices throughout the curriculum.

• The ability to collect, organise and manipulate data effectively.

To enhance our Computing Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities through after school/ lunchtime clubs.

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

At St. Cedd’s, we teach Design and Technology through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be a Design Technologist. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• Significant levels of originality and the willingness to take creative risks to produce innovative ideas and prototypes.

• An excellent attitude to learning and independent working.

• The ability to use time efficiently and work constructively and productively with others.

• The ability to carry out thorough research, show initiative and ask questions to develop an exceptionally detailed knowledge of users’ needs.

• The ability to act as responsible designers and makers, working ethically, using finite materials carefully and working safely.

• A thorough knowledge of which tools, equipment and materials to use to make their products.

• The ability to apply mathematical knowledge.

• The ability to manage risks exceptionally well to manufacture products safely and hygienically.

• A passion for the subject and knowledge of, up-to-date technological innovations in materials, products and systems.

To enhance our Design and Technology Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities such as visits out of school and visitors in school who demonstrate design concepts through motivating activities as well as through after school/ lunchtime clubs.

Design and Technology on a Page

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

At St. Cedd’s, we teach Geography through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be a Geographer. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• An excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like.

• An excellent understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected and how much human and physical environments are interrelated.

• An extensive base of geographical knowledge and vocabulary.

• Fluency in complex, geographical enquiry and the ability to apply questioning skills and use effective analytical and presentational techniques.

• The ability to reach clear conclusions and develop a reasoned argument to explain findings.

• Significant levels of originality, imagination or creativity as shown in interpretations and representations of the subject matter.

• Highly developed and frequently utilised fieldwork and other geographical skills and techniques.

• A passion for and commitment to the subject, and a real sense of curiosity to find out about the world and the people who live there.

• The ability to express well-balanced opinions, rooted in very good knowledge and understanding about current and contemporary issues in society and the

environment.

To enhance our Geography Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities such as visits out of school and visitors in school who demonstrate geographic concepts through motivating activities as well as through after school/ lunchtime clubs.

Geography on a Page

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

At St. Cedd’s, we teach History through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be a Historian. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• An excellent knowledge and understanding of people, events, and contexts from a range of historical periods and of historical concepts and processes.

• The ability to think critically about history and communicate ideas very confidently in styles appropriate to a range of audiences.

• The ability to consistently support, evaluate and challenge their own and others’ views using detailed, appropriate and accurate historical evidence derived from a

range of sources.

• The ability to think, reflect, debate, discuss and evaluate the past, formulating and refining questions and lines of enquiry.

• A passion for history and an enthusiastic engagement in learning, which develops their sense of curiosity about the past and their understanding of how and why

people interpret the past in different ways.

• A respect for historical evidence and the ability to make robust and critical use of it to support their explanations and judgments.

• A desire to embrace challenging activities, including opportunities to undertake high-quality research across a range of history topics.

To enhance our History Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities such as visits out of school and visitors in school who demonstrate historian concepts through motivating activities as well as through after school/ lunchtime clubs.

History on a Page

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

At St. Cedd’s, we teach Languages through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be a Linguistic. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• The confidence to speak with good intonation and pronunciation.

• Fluency in reading.

• Fluency and imagination in writing.

• A strong awareness of the culture of the countries where the language is spoken.

• A passion for languages and a commitment to the subject.

• The ability to use language creatively and spontaneously.

• An independence in their studies and the ability to draw upon a wide range of resources.

To enhance our Languages Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities such as themed days/ weeks.

Spanish on a Page

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

At St. Cedd’s, we teach Music through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be a Musician. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• A rapidly widening repertoire which they use to create original, imaginative, fluent and distinctive composing and performance work.

• A musical understanding underpinned by high levels of aural perception, internalisation and knowledge of music, including high or rapidly developing levels of technical expertise.

• Very good awareness and appreciation of different musical traditions and genres.

• An excellent understanding of how musical provenance – the historical, social and cultural origins of music – contributes to the diversity of musical styles.

• The ability to give precise written and verbal explanations, using musical terminology effectively, accurately and appropriately.

• A passion for and commitment to a diverse range of musical activities.

To enhance our Music Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities such as visits out of school and visitors in school who demonstrate musical concepts through motivating activities as well as through after school/ lunchtime clubs and 1:1 tuition.

Music on a Page

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

At St. Cedd’s, we teach Physical Education through The National Curriculum alongside Chris Quigley Essentials. Children develop key skills to be a Sportsperson. We have a focus on developing the following Essential Characteristics:

• The ability to acquire new knowledge and skills exceptionally well and develop an in-depth understanding of PE.

• The willingness to practise skills in a wide range of different activities and situations, alone, in small groups and in teams and to apply these skills in chosen activities to achieve exceptionally high levels of performance.

• High levels of physical fitness.

• A healthy lifestyle, achieved by eating sensibly, avoiding smoking, drugs and alcohol and exercising regularly.

• The ability to remain physically active for sustained periods of time and an understanding of the importance of this in promoting long-term health and well-being.

• The ability to take the initiative and become excellent young leaders, organising and officiating, and evaluating what needs to be done to improve, and motivating and instilling excellent sporting attitudes in others.

• Exceptional levels of originality, imagination and creativity in their techniques, tactics and choreography, knowledge of how to improve their own and others’ performance and the ability to work independently for extended periods of time without the need of guidance or support.

• A keen interest in PE. A willingness to participate eagerly in every lesson, highly positive attitudes and the ability to make informed choices about engaging fully in extra-curricular sport.

• The ability to swim at least 25 metres before the end of Year 6 and knowledge of how to remain safe in and around water.

To enhance our Physical Education Curriculum, we offer enrichment opportunities such as participation in out of school events, swimming lessons and an external sports coach in school who demonstrates physical concepts through motivating activities as well as through after school/ lunchtime clubs.

PE on a Page

Curriculum Key Skills Overview

St Cedd’s Sports Directory

The Relationships Education, RSE, and Health Education (England) Regulations 2019 made
Relationships Education compulsory in all primary schools from September 2020.

The aims of relationships and sex education (RSE) at our school are to:

  • Provide a framework in which sensitive discussions can take place
  • Prepare pupils for puberty, and give them an understanding of sexual development and the importance of
    health and hygiene
  • Help pupils develop feelings of self-respect, confidence and empathy
  • Create a positive culture around issues of sexuality and relationships
  • Teach pupils the correct vocabulary to describe themselves and their bodies

Relationships and Sex Education Policy

At St Cedd’s we want to make our curriculum as exciting and interesting as possible. One way to do this is to invite visitors into school to hold workshops. In recent years, we have had chocolate workshops, Roman workshops, animal workshops and Shakespeare Company performances. At other times, we may choose to take the children out of school to visit a famous building, or to take part in an event. Some of our favourite places have been the Royal Opera House, Westminster Abbey and the O2 Arena in London. We also encourage the children to take part in residential visits. Year 6 have visited Margam in South Wales and Year 4 and Year 5  have experienced an overnight stay in Danbury Outdoors Centre.

Where trips/ visitors incur a cost, parents/ carers will be asked to make a contribution, however, no child will be excluded because of such a refusal.

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